Author Archives: publichistorytcd

Cookie Crumbles #22

Hello all!

Here in Ireland we are currently in a period that some have dubbed ‘The Decade of Commemoration.’ For those of you who are not that familiar with Irish history, here is a link from Irish History Compressed that outlines the main events involved. The 1913 Lockout, which began in August 1913, is the first major event to be remembered. Here is a brief look from BBC News at the legacy behind the Lockout.

Photo Credit: Marcus Ginns via Royal Albert Hall

Photo Credit: Marcus Ginns via Royal Albert Hall

For anyone who has experienced the joy of visiting the Victoria and Albert museum, or any of the other institutions located in west London (also dubbed Albertopolis), you have one man in particular to thank for his inspiration and effort. Here is a brief history of Prince Albert’s influence on Kensington’s Cultural Quarter.

In honor of the recent passing of Seamus Heaney, here is a link to 11 videos of Heaney reading his poems aloud. This literary master will be truly missed.

For all you history buffs out there, here is an interesting link to list of the ‘Worst Dictators You’ve Probably Never Heard Of.’ Have you heard of any who made the list? Or is there someone else you felt should have been included? Let us know in the comments!

Here is a link to an article discussing a proposed tax on the sale of antiquities. Although the idea has some merits in regards to helping source countries raise funds to promote and protect their own heritage, the idea still needs a lot of work if it will be able to be beneficial to all. What do you think?

Finally, here is an example of what can happen when social media and history connect. After compiling a wealth of information, a group of historians (or ‘Ripperologists’) have begun tweeting a real time account of the events surrounding Jack the Ripper and his infamous killing of women in London’s East End. Follow the Twitter here.

Until next week!

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Cookie Crumbles #21

Hello all!

Sorry for the month hiatus, but dissertation writing demands constant attention when it gets to the final stages of writing. After taking a week off for recovery, we are back!

First of all, here’s an article discussing a proposed new timeline for the origins of Ancient Egypt. With new research utilizing radiocarbon dating, it is now being suggested that the pre-dynastic period would have begun around 3600/3700 BC rather than 4000 BC, meaning that the civilization’s eventual rise to power took only 500-600 years rather than over 900. Kind of amazing when you think about it!

Photo Credit: The Daily Beast (Courtesy Semmel Concerts)

Photo Credit: The Daily Beast (Courtesy Semmel Concerts)

Speaking of Egypt, the burial mask pictured above is an exact replica of Tutankhamun’s and brings to light an interesting question. Is displaying replicas of famous artifacts, or even famous works of art, just as good as going to see the originals? Granted, originals lend an air of authenticity making the experience seem more worthwhile, but can we learn almost as much from copies on display? Let us know what you think in the comments.

Next up, here’s a collection of six awesome apps you can download (some for free!) to either take a virtual field trip, or to enhance your visitor experience. Take a look at some extra suggestions on downloadable apps in the comment section too!

I don’t know about you, but we are super excited to see The Monument’s Men (trailer above) coming out this December (January in the UK/Ireland). In honor of the movie, here is an article covering five stories of art saved from war, including the one documented in the movie. Be sure to also check out the book behind the movie, written by Robert Edsel.

In TV news, a new three-part documentary series that explores the role of women in Restoration England, ‘Harlots, Housewives and Heroines: A 17th Century History for Girls’ is currently airing on BBC Four. Learn more about it here. The next episode airs this Wednesday at 8:00pm.

Last, but not least, here’s an interesting map for everyone to explore. The ‘1931 Histomap’ claims to be the entire history of the world laid out in one easy to follow chart. It might not be entirely accurate, but it sure is a fun read!

Until next week!

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Cookie Crumbles #20

Hello all!

For those of you who have been living under a rock this past week, one of the biggest stories was of course the birth of Prince Williams and Princess Kate’s newborn son, His Royal Highness Prince George Alexander Louis of Cambridge. For the complete story start here.

Photo Credit: AFP Getty Images

Photo Credit: AFP Getty Images

Linked here is an article from BBC History with a look into how royal births have been announced celebrated throughout the years, from the 1841 birth of King Edward II all the way up to baby George himself.

Photo Credit: John Makely, NBC News

Photo Credit: John Makely, NBC News

Dubbed “The coolest museum you’ll never see,” the CIA museum, which is housed in various hallways throughout the organization’s headquarters, boasts hundreds of top secret mementos and artifacts, including the recent addition of what is allegedly Osama Bin Laden’s AK-47. The museum isn’t open to the public, and is rarely allowed to be photographed, but you can find out more about this fascinating collection here.

In a horrifying turn of events for the art world, it looks as if 7 masterpieces (by the artists Picasso, Matisse, Monet, Gauguin, Lucian Freud and Meyer de Haan) that were stolen from the Kunsthal Museum in Rotterdam may have been destroyed in order to cover up the crime. Read more about it here and here.

Photo Credit: Sky Entertainment

Photo Credit: Sky Entertainment

 

To balance out the art news for the week, a documentary celebrating the life and work of Irish sculptor, Rowan Gillespie, will be airing this Friday at 4pm on Sky Arts 1. Having met Mr. Gillespie when he came in to speak to our class about his work, we are confident that this is one documentary you don’t want to miss. Find out more about it here. If you don’t have time to watch, here’s a link to Mr. Gillespie’s website.

Photo Credit: Buzzfeed/www.whispy.com

Photo Credit: Buzzfeed/www.whispy.com

Photo Credit: Buzzfeed/http://bookpatrol.tumblr.com

Photo Credit: Buzzfeed/http://bookpatrol.tumblr.com

We’ve shared with you before links to fabulously beautiful libraries around the world, but this one from Buzzfeed containing 49 of the most breathtaking libraires from around the world may be the best yet. Trinity again made the list, coming in at number 6.

As technology continues to advance, so does our ability to create stunning tools and displays that help us to understand history and archaeology in new and exciting ways. Here the Battle of Gettysburg gets the 20th century touch as a full terrain map of the battlefield is created so that we can more fully visualize what the commanders would have seen (and perhaps missed).

Last but not least, here’s and interesting article containing some little known facts about Oscar Wilde’s niece.

Until next week!

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Cookie Crumbles #19

Hello all!

First off, here’s a link to an article entitled ‘Is the Absence of Violence the Same Thing as Real Peace?’ It explores an issue that is near to all of us here in Ireland, namely ‘the Troubles’ that took place in the North from the late 1960s until the late 1990s (more on that here). The title of the article itself brings to light an interesting question. After the initial aftermath of something like the Troubles or a Civil war begin to fade from the landscape, does that mean that the issue is all but over? What must be done in the way or reconciliation and dealing with polarization in order to ensure that the scars from the conflict don’t flare up again?

Photo Credit: British Museum

Photo Credit: British Museum

On a somewhat lighter note, this week in history the Rosetta Stone was found, finally giving us a guideline for decoding Egyptian hieroglyphics. Discovered by soldiers on Napoleon’s campaign through Egypt on July 15 1799, the find was written up in a report on July 19th and has been the object of much study (and debate as to who it belongs) since then. Currently part of the holdings of the British Museum, you can find out more about this incredible object here.

Here’s a link to an interesting story on ‘The Art of Deception’ or forgery and it’s place in the art world. With more and more dealers and forgery rings making the news lately, it will be interesting to see how law enforcement, and the art community, reacts.

Speaking of forgeries, our next story has long been hailed as a giant fake by many members of the public. We however, believe that it 100% did occur. We are of course speaking of the famed Apollo 11 moon landing on July 20th 1969 by Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin and Michael Collins that celebrates its 44th anniversary this year. To look at some famous photos from this historic event, check out this link from Mashable here and be sure to also look at this link to the 1969 issue of National Geographic detailing the landing which can be found here.

With all the risks involved in landing a man on the moon, there was a chance that the men would not make it back to Earth safely. As a precaution, a speech was prepared to read to the American public to explain this catastrophe and revere the men who had taken on a dangerous and ultimately life ending mission. Luckily for all of us, the men made it back safely and history (the good kind) was made. In this article
from mentalfloss, 12 famous historical speeches, including the one written in case of disastrous moon landing are recorded.

Last but not least, here’s a look into the history of the postage stamp. We’ve also included a video above from the Discovery Channel show “How It’s Made” which takes a more in-depth look at how stamps are created.

Until next week!

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Cookie Crumbles #18

Hello all!

First off, Happy Bastille Day! This holiday occurs every year on the 14th to commemorate the storming of the prison in 1789. July 14th is also known as the Fete de la Federation which occurred a year later in 1790. Learn more about the background of both of these events in this article from BBC news.

Photo Credit: Alison Nastasi, Flavorwire

Photo Credit: Alison Nastasi, Flavorwire

This article from Flavorwire introduces us to some of the world’s smallest museums and galleries, including one museum (which is really no larger than a closet) in Alabama dedicated to Edgar Allen Poe. We think you’ll agree that these would definitely make for some interesting places to visit.

Photo Credit: Napoleon Sarony

Photo Credit: Napoleon Sarony

If Nikola Tesla was still alive, he would have celebrated his 157th birthday on July 10th. A great inventor and visionary, Tesla is unfortunately not as well-known as his contemporaries such as Thomas Edison since others often took credit for his ideas. Linked here is an article with 13 quotes made by Tesla throughout his life on everything from the mysteries of life to gender equality. Be sure to also check out this comic from The Oatmeal detailing why Tesla was the greatest geek who ever lived.

BBC One’s newest documentary/drama series, The White Queen, is focused around the life of Elizabeth Woodville who was the wife of Edward the IV, a key player in the War of the Roses. You can find out more about her here. Phillipa Gregory, the author whose novel created the basis for the new series talks more about the research that went into the book and subsequent series in this article.

Although it’s a bit overdue, we would like to wish America a very happy 237th Birthday. Linked above and in this companion article are 50 fun facts about the United States. We also want to give a shout out to Canada, who celebrated their birthday on July 1st. Read more about their independence day here.

Last but not least, here’s a link to an article on 11 famous works of art that were never actually completed. The list includes the The Silmarillion by Tolkien (a novel later completed by his son Christopher) as well as Mozart’s Requiem.

Until next week!

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Cookie Crumbles #17

Hello all! These past few weeks have been super busy for us, but here is your long overdue installment of Cookie Crumbles.

The 37th annual conference of the World Heritage Council took place this past week in Cambodia, where it was voted to add 19 new sites to the World Heritage List. Read more about the newly chosen locations and the reasons behind their selection here.

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On June 16th we celebrated Bloomsday, an annual holiday held to honor the author James Joyce, and his “decidedly difficult Magnum Opus” Ulysses. Find instructions on how to celebrate this unique holiday here, including a recipe for creating your very own “James Joyce” cocktail. We’ve also included this link illustrating Ulysses in 18 easy to understand cartoons for those of you who have never read the novel in it’s entirely, or just want to know what all the fuss is about.

Interesting tumblr highlight of the week: Great Art in Ugly Rooms. Check out this article on flavorwire, highlighting some of the more interesting pictures. If you have more time, check out the full tumblr page here.

In some positive public history news, it has been reported that the British Museum is experiencing record crowds partly as a result of their dynamic current exhibition schedule. If you haven’t already gone and you happen to be in London at all between now and September 29th, definitely make a point to go see the current exhibition, Life and Death in Pompeii and Herculaneum, which you can read more about here. We’ve also included a link to the British Museum’s website if you want to learn more about this fascinating presentation.

Photo Credit: National Gallery of Ireland

Photo Credit: National Gallery of Ireland

In other exhibition news, there are also a few shows making headlines in Ireland. The Perceptions of Landscape: From Galway to Leenane exhibition currently on at the National Gallery in Dublin highlights 41 watercolors done by William Evans of Eton during his west-coast travels through pre-famine Ireland. Read a full review from the Irish Times here. and make sure to go check out the show, which will be on in the Print Gallery until September 29th, 2013.

Last but not least, following on the heels of our last post, here’s a link to 75 “looking into the past” pictures. Amazing how much can change over time.

Until next week!

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Cookie Crumbles #16

Hello all!

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Linked above is a video about the Internet Archive, a storehouse of digital information in San Francisco put together by a non-profit team of librarians and archivists. They also aim to collect over 10 million volumes of physical books to digitize and subsequently store. Ultimately, their goal is to provide universal access to all knowledge. In their opinion by keeping things active and accessible to the public they are subsequently able to keep them relevant and therefore worth saving and remembering. In other words, “access drives preservation.”

If you want to check out the internet archive itself, take a look here.

This year marked the 69th anniversary of the invasion of Normandy during WWII, otherwise known as D-Day. On June 6, 1944 a group of heroic Allied troops stormed the beaches in what became the largest sea-bound invasion in history. Tragically over 10,000 soldiers died over the course of the battle. If you want to learn more about this historic event, check out this short video from the History Channel here.

We talked a few weeks ago about Amelia Earhart’s historical flight across the Atlantic in May of 1932. Recently, researchers have discovered the remains of a plane off the coast of an uninhabited island in the South Pacific what may turn out to be the craft in which she took her final flight in June of 1937. Check out more on the story here.

This year marks the 24th anniversary of the protest in Tiananmen Square. Despite the fact that so much time has passed this event is still not publicly acknowledged by the Chinese government. However, due to the rise of social media the event is still able to be remembered and commemorated by those in China as well as those abroad. This situation brings up interesting questions in regards to the censorship and selective memory associated with contested events in history. What do you think?

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Last, but not least, photographer Kerényi Zoltán has created some truly amazing work with his “Windows to the Past” series of pictures, like the one we have featured above. Be sure to take a look at some of the highlights being featured in this article from Buzzfeed or if you have more time, be sure to check out the complete collection on Zoltán’s Flickr account here.

Until next week!

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Cookie Crumbles #15

Hello all!

One of the most interesting stories in public history this week is the launching of the Mary Rose Museum, a completely reconstructed version of the warship, Mary Rose, that sank in 1545 during a conflict with the French and was re-discovered in 1971. To find out more, check out this interactive article from BBC on the ship, the museum and some of its artifacts or watch the news coverage of the museum linked above.

Here’s an interesting article from Buzzfeed filled with fun facts about Captains and Commanders of the last few centuries. Which one were you most surprised to learn?

A new center for arts and culture is currently in the planning stages in New York City. From its proposed home in the Hudson Yards, the NYC “Culture Shed” is aiming to be the future hub for concerts, openings and other events. To find out more about this innovative new design, click here.

In honor of the anniversary of Joan of Arc’s death (she was burned at the stake on May 30th, 1431), here’s a link to an article with some little known facts about this famous French martyr.

Last but not least, linked above is a fascinating video on the History of Typography. Take a look!

Until next week!

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Cookie Crumbles #14

Hello all!

A digger claws away at the sloping sides of the Mayan pyramid in Belize

One of the most upsetting stories from the past two weeks is the destruction of a Mayan pyramid in Belize The Noh Mul temple was bulldozed by a construction company for road filling. Read more about it here and here.

The clip above is the first episode in the fascinating History Channel series, Tudors From Above. It looks at the Tudor dynasty and their influence on the country through aerial photography and video of the landscape. Longer than the videos we normally link, but definitely worth watching.

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In other British aerial news, in honor of their tenth anniversary, the Museum of London Docklands commissioned this exhibition of the London Skyline made entirely out of sugar cubes. So cool!

In memory of Amelia Earhart’s flight across the Atlantic on May 17, 1932, here’s a link to a video documentary containing photographs that have recently been uncovered in relation to this famed flight.

ny-public-library-reading

Finally, in celebration of the 102nd anniversary of the New York Library being dedicated (read more here!) we give you this article that proves why libraries are not yet irrelevant yet. We hope that it stays that way!!

Until next week!

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Cookie Crumbles #13

This month, we celebrate the 70th anniversary of the Battle of the Atlantic, which was the longest continuous military campaign of WWII. This campaign was of particular importance because German submarines or U-boasts were a major threat to the Allies’ trade routes and defense. Anniversary events are taking place throughout May across England. Check out more on these fascinating commemorations here.

This week, legislation to officially pardon the men who left the Irish Army to join the British armed forces during WWII. Many of these men faced punishment upon their return home and had difficulty finding jobs, or lost their pensions. Although most of these soldiers are no longer alive, the pardons will hopefully allow these men to be remembered with honor, instead of being ignored.

This past February, the book ‘The Secret Museum’ by Molly Oldfield was published. Covering 69 artifacts from across 5 continents, this book explores the unknown treasures buried in museum basements around the world. Read more about some of the highlights here.

Pinturicchio‘s recently restored Vatican fresco, ‘Resurrection’, which was created in 1494 is now thought to be the first appearance of Native Americans in a Western artwork. This occurrence is thought by some to be a result of Christopher Columbus’ 1492 voyage to the New World. Others claim that since accounts of the voyage were not published until the 1800s, that this could not be the case. Take a look here, and let us know what you think!

After 234 years, a famous collection of old masters is returning to the United Kingdom. Originally collected by Sir Richard Walpole, Britain’s first prime minister, the works were then sold in 1779 to Catherine the Great to pay off debts after his death. Currently on loan from museums and galleries in Russia and America, the exhibition at Houghton Hall (the original home of the works) will take place from May 17th until September 29th, 2013. Read all about it here.

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Last but not least, here’s a hilarious link that covers Art History as explained by Beyoncé lyrics.

Until next week!

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